The moving story of Francine Christophe (video).

Born in 1933, Francine Christophe was deported with her mother at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1944. Released the following year, she continues to share her experience and memories, particularly with the younger generations. Watch the video below: Source: Youtube.

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New museum honors Poles killed for helping Jews in Holocaust.

Poland’s President Andrzej Duda opened a new museum that will honor hundreds of Poles killed for helping Jews during the Holocaust. The Ulma Family Museum of Poles Saving Jews, in the village of Markowa, opens at the site in southern Poland where Germans killed an entire family for sheltering Jews in 1944. The victims included Read More

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Scrolls found in secret Warsaw ghetto synagogue.

The three Books of Esther scrolls survived the liquidation of the ghetto following the 1943 uprising and remained hidden until recently, when the collapse of a wall in an old building revealed the synagogue. Three Books of Esther scrolls that survived the Holocaust and were read on Purim were recently discovered in a hidden synagogue Read More

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Holocaust drama wins the Oscar for best foreign language film.

The Hungarian movie “Son of Saul,” a harrowing Holocaust drama, won the Oscar on Sunday for best foreign language film. It was Hungarian-French director László Nemes’ first full-length film and had been seen as the Oscar favorite after winning a Golden Globe and taking the second-highest prize at the Cannes Film Festival. “Even in the Read More

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Day of remembrance of Holocaust.

On January 27, International Holocaust Memorial Day, and throughout the month, Yahad-In Unum paid tribute to all victims of the Holocaust through commemorations and exhibitions around the world. From New York to Guatemala City to Brussels, Yahad-In Unum worked in partnership with organizations to showcase our “Holocaust by Bullets” and new “Roma Memory” exhibitions. As Read More

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“I Was a Nazi, and Here’s Why”.

In recent years, many victims of violence have written memoirs in which they seek out and confront the perpetrators who harmed them. The opposite is rare. Few perpetrators seek out their victims, let alone write books about them. But fifty years ago this month, Melita Maschmann, a former Nazi, published just such a book. “Fazit,” Read More

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